Sharks

shark on beach


About this image:
This photograph was taken on 28 September 2006 by the Save Our Seas White Shark Research Team while visually tracking a large white shark first identified by the Fish Hoek Shark Spotter On that day the research team were at Seal Island when they got a call from the Fish Hoek shark spotter that a large white shark had just entered Fish Hoek Bay. No swimmers were in the water at the time as the law enforcement and shark spotters closed the beach while the shark was in the bay. (Photograph used with permission from Alison Kock of the Save Our Seas Shark Centre.)

 

The top section of this page provides up to date news and media releases relating to the white shark situation as it effects Fish Hoek. The lower sectioncontains wider information about the Great White Shark..

 

BREAKING NEWS -

 

SKY NEWS - UK

'Bystanders Actions Save Shark Attack Victim'

1:32pm UK, Thursday September 29, 2011

The quick-thinking actions of bystanders who used a wet suit and two belts as a makeshift tourniquet have been praised as saving the life of a British man whose legs were savaged in a shark attack.

Doctors said Michael Cohen owed his life to those who responded in the crucial moments after he was mauled by a great white at the popular tourist beach of Fish Hoek in Cape Town.

The 42-year-old accountant had gone swimming despite the beach being closed and shark warnings being issued after three of the killer species were sighted lurking offshore just 90 minutes earlier.

He was the only one in the water at the time.

Witnesses pulled him from the ocean soon after the attack and reported his right leg was missing, while his left leg had been severed below the knee.

He was taken to the private Constantiaberg Medi-Clinic hospital where doctors used over seven litres of blood to stabilise him before he underwent hours of delicate surgery.

 

If he wanted to swim, he swam. We warned him often that he was taking a risk, but he always said 'if a shark takes me, then blame me, not the shark'.

Cape Town shark spotter Monwabisi Sikweyiya

Professor Andrew Nichol said: "I just want to commend the first aid work of those on the beach and the tremendous way in which they responded actually saved the life of this patient."

"That tourniquet has consisted of a wetsuit applied around the thigh and wrapped around with two belts very, very tightly.

"It was an amateur tourniquet but it had almost completely resulted in a cessation of blood loss."

Mr Nichol added that Mr Cohen, who remains heavily sedated and is in a critical but stable condition, would have to undergo more surgery in the coming days to save his left leg.

He said there is extensive tissue damage to the ankle where there is a bite mark down to the bone, raising concerns about blood flow to the foot.

"With him having lost the right leg it is absolutely imperative we do everything in our power to ensure that left leg remains viable and we will continue to go flat out on that," he said.

British accountant Michael Cohen, 42, is reportedly fighting for his life in hospital after being attacked by a shark at a beach in Cape Town .

Mr Cohen, a British accountant, has lived in South Africa for many years

One of the first on the scene was shark spotter Monwabisi Sikweyiya, who has told how he helped drag the victim from the water.

He said Mr Cohen had lived in the area for years and was known as a regular swimmer at the beach.

"He was very interested in sharks and respected them, but never took any notice of our warnings," he told The Daily Telegraph.

"If he wanted to swim, he swam. We warned him often that he was taking a risk, but he always said 'if a shark takes me, then blame me, not the shark'.

Mr Cohen, who is a UK passport holder but has South African citizenship, reportedly lives with his family in the Cape Town suburb of Plumstead, which is about 10 miles (16km) from the beach.

The aftermath of the attack and the shark thought to be responsible

The shark responsible for the attack was caught on camera by onlookers

On his Facebook profile page he lists open water swimming as one of his favourite sports.

About seven people are attacked by sharks along South Africa's coastline each year, with an average of 10% resulting in death.

Zimbabwean visitor Lloyd Skinner, 47, was mauled to death as he swam off Fish Hoek beach in January.

 

Sky News - please visit source for more information

 

www.iol.co.za How two men and seal saved shark victim - please visit source for more information..

September 29 2011 at 02:20pm 
By MURRAY WILLIAMS and NATASHA PRINCE

 

IOL shark attack

INLSA

The shark that attacked at Clovelly Corner swims 20m form the shore. Photo: Michael Walker

Related Stories

Two Cape Town men have been lauded as heroes after risking their lives to rescue a badly injured swimmer, while the shark which had attacked him lurked nearby.

Douglas Drysdale, 61, from Glencairn Heights, and Hugh Till, 66, from Fish Hoek had been returning home from Pollsmoor Prison, where they work as spiritual guidance volunteers.

Usually, they look out for whales as they approach Clovelly Corner, but yesterday they saw a lone swimmer and a dark shape in the water.

They hurriedly parked their car and raced down the beach, screaming warnings. But it was too late. The shark had struck.

Drysdale and Till kicked off their shoes and waded into the surf towards the badly injured swimmer struggling as blood swirled around him.

Drysdale paused to call emergency services, then headed for deeper water. He and Till grabbed the swimmer’s hands and pulled him back to shore.

Then, bystanders shouted that the shark was back, and swimming directly towards the three men. Till and Drysdale were making slow progress, struggling to drag the swimmer to safety.

Suddenly, another dark shape appeared in the water: a seal, which swam between the shark and the men, then continued to circle the men as they neared the shore.

On the sand at Clovelly Corner, shark spotters who had joined Drysdale and Till in the shallows to help them tried to calm and reassure the swimmer. One shark spotter tied his belt around the stump where the shark had torn off the right leg below the knee.

Drysdale and Till did not want to speak to the media, and issued a statement through the National Sea Rescue Institute.

The NSRI said two paramedics from Cape Medical Response – NSRI Simon’s Town station commander Darren Zimmerman and Kim Yon – found a “pale and weak patient struggling to breathe with a weak, thready pulse and no blood pressure”.

The man “was fully conscious and paramedics applied oxygen and turned his body, placing his head downhill of the beach to try to bring up his blood pressure while bilateral intravenous fluid lines were set up in both arms”, the NSRI’s Craig Lambinon said yesterday.

The man’s pulse and blood pressure were far stronger by the time he was air-lifted to Constantiaberg Medi-Clinic, Lambinon added.

ER24 paramedics said part of his left calf had also been bitten off, though the leg was still intact.

Four surgeons managed to save the man’s left leg after complex emergency surgery yesterday.

Hospital spokeswoman Faye Kariem said today: “He’s in a stable but critical condition in ICU... “

The man’s name was reported elsewhere as Michael Cohen, but this could not be confirmed.

Sarah Titley of the City of Cape Town’s Shark Spotting Programme said spotters on the beach had “tried everything” to warn the swimmer.

The beach was closed at the time of the attack because white sharks had been spotted, said Gregg Oelofse of the Cape Town Environmental Management Department.

The first sighting was at 9.30am.

“The siren was sounded, and the beach was closed. It was reopened at about 9.45am, under a red flag, which goes up after a sighting, indicating there are sharks in the area.

“The sharks were sighted again at about 10.50am, and the beach was again closed, under the white ‘shark’ flag,” Oelofse said.

When the man had entered the water at Clovelly Corner one spotter ran down the beach and another drove down to Clovelly Corner, but “the shark attack had taken place”.

“When they saw him, they did try to sound the siren, but the electricity outage made this impossible.”

Cape Town was hit by a city-wide blackout at about 11am yesterday. - Cape Argus

www.iol.co.za - please visit source

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SHARK ATTACKS SWIMMER (44) - 28th September 2011 Fish Hoek Beach - Reports of this incident will be updated throughout today/tonight - as news comes in..

 

These videos were uploaded to YouTube (on 28th September 2011)

 

 

 

Newspaper Reports.

 

fh beach

photo: News24.com

The following excerpt is from news24.com - please visit the source for more information.

Fish Hoek shark attack: What we saw

by MyNews24 Editor
2011-09-28 15:06

A man, 44, was swimming approximately 50 metres offshore at Clovelly corner at the far end of Fish Hoek beach when he was bitten "numerous times" on Wednesday morning.

Two News24 users, who were near the beach shortly before and after the incident, share their experiences.

Lorraine Lemmon-Warde:
This morning at 11am, after the shark warning siren had sounded, I watched a shark circling in the corner of Fish Hoek Beach very close to where we swim every day.  

It looked like a scene in an aquarium - the whole body was visible in the crystal clear water and the fins kept breaking the surface. It was close to the Catwalk's rocks and kelp and moved through the area where Tyna Webb lost her life a few years ago. 

The shark was in the area for a fairly long time.

Karin Joubert:
I was at the beach when the shark spotters closed the beach and a siren was not initiated due to a power failure. 

Also, the shark spotter on duty at the beach did not blow a whistle. The white flag was raised indicating a shark had been spotted. The shark spotter was on the beach and waved at two swimmers in the Fish Hoek main beach waters to get out.

At the same time there were people swimming in the Clovelly beach area.

I left shortly after that and about 10 minutes later saw paramedics and ambulances rushing to Clovelly. At the time of the attack there was still no power and during the one hour I spent at the beach no siren was sounded.

==================================================================================================

Reports of this incident will be updated throughout today/tonight - as news comes in..

 

 

This extract is from news.iafrica.com - please visit the source for more information.

=====================================================================================

Bystander rescues victim

A man attacked by a great white shark at Fish Hoek beach in Cape Town on Wednesday afternoon was rescued by a stranger, the NSRI said.

"It appears he was rescued from the water by a bystander who left the scene before we could identify him," National Sea Rescue Institute spokesperson Craig Lambinon said.

"On arrival, a 42-year-old man was found on the shore suffering complete amputation of his right leg, above the knee, and partial amputation of his left leg, below the knee."

Lambinon said the victim was believed to be a 42-year-old British citizen living in the Cape Town suburb of Plumstead. The man was stabilised at the scene and airlifted to Constantiaberg Medi-Clinic in a critical condition.

"The man was conscious when paramedics attended to him on the beach, but was sedated on-scene by paramedics in their efforts to stabilise the patient," Lambinon said.

The City of Cape Town said when the man entered the water, the beach was still closed. A shark flag, indicating the presence of a great white, was flying. A shark spotter stationed on the beach was warned by a spotter on the mountain that someone had entered the water.

The spotter then ran to Clovelly Corner to try and get the swimmer out of the water, but the attack took place before he could reach him.

The city said the attack happened around 12.15pm. Shark spotters sighted the shark at 10.45am and then closed the beach. The white shark flag was raised and the siren set off.

The victim of the shark attack was the only person in the water at the time.

Fish Hoek beach as well as Glencairn, St James and Muizenberg beaches were closed as a precaution until further notice. The shark was still in Fish Hoek bay in the afternoon and being monitored by the spotters. news.iafrica.com

============================================================================================

 

This is from the UK Daily telegraph - Please visit this source for more information.

 

British man mauled by shark

A British expat is believed to have been attacked by a shark while swimming off the coast of Cape Town in South Africa.

British man mauled by shark: A 42-year-old British man in a critical condition is stretchered off the beach after being attacked by a shark in South Africa
 
A 42-year-old British man in a critical condition is stretchered off the beach Photo: CATERS NEWS

By Stewart Maclean

3:14PM BST 28 Sep 2011

The 42-year-old is understood to be an expat who had lived in Cape Town for several years.

He reportedly lost most of his right leg and part of his left foot after being repeatedly bitten by the Great White.

Several beaches along the city's False Bay coastline this afternoon remained closed after officials warned it was likely the deadly beast remained in the area.

Craig Lambinon, a spokesman for the National Sea Rescue Institute, said the victim was this afternoon in a serious condition in a private hospital in the city.

"This man was swimming around 50 metres from the beach when the shark attacked him at around 12.20pm," he said.

"It repeatedly bit at both of his legs and caused serious wounds on both the right and left side.

"The man managed to make it back towards the shore and was stabilised on the beach.

"He was then airlifted to hospital where his right leg was amputated above the knee and his left foot was partially amputated.

"He remains in a critical condition."

Local media today reported that a shark had been sighted several times before today's attack at Clovelly Beach near the popular holiday resort of Fish Hoek, around 20 miles south of Cape Town.

A video uploaded on YouTube taken moments after the attack shows a shark lurking in the water.

In it a huge shark can be clearly seen swimming within a few feet of the shoreline as frightened members of the public gather on the beach.

A statement released by the organisation also claimed the swimmer had ignored explicit orders not to enter the water.
The statement said: "On arrival on-scene a 42 year old man was found on the shore suffering complete amputation of his right leg, above the knee, and partial amputation of his left leg, below the knee. 
"It appears he was rescued from the water by a bystander who left the scene before we could identify him.
"The 42 year old man is believed to be a British citizen but resident locally in South Africa, but this has not yet been confirmed.

"The man was stabilised on-scene by paramedics and airlifted to Constantiaberg Medi-Clinic hospital by helicopter in a critical condition but he is now believed to have been stabilised.

"The man was conscious when paramedics attended to him on the beach but was sedated on-scene by paramedics in their efforts to stabilise the patient."

It added: "From what we understand the City of Cape Town shark spotters had flown the "sharks present – no swimming" flags since early this morning and bathers to Fish Hoek and the individual had personally been warned, by the shark spotters, not to swim due to the presence of at least three White Sharks visible in the water close inshore since this morning."

 

================================================================================end of reports 28-09-2011

 

 

NEWS:

CITY OF CAPE TOWN MEDIA RELEASE 25 AUGUST 2010

City warns of seasonal increase in inshore presence of White Sharks

The City of Cape Town would like to warn all beach users that we are approaching a time of year that usually yields a seasonal increase in the inshore presence of white sharks. “While sharks are present in our waters all year round, the City appeals to residents to be particularly vigilant in the coming months, when inshore activity tends to intensify,” said Mayoral Committee Member for Community Services, Councillor Brett Herron.

Research Director for the Shark Spotters programme, Alison Kock, says scientific evidence confirms that sharks change their habitat seasonally. In winter they tend to group near seal colonies, whereas in summer they tend towards coastal inshore areas. Records indicate that over the last six years, the highest number of interactions between white sharks and recreational beach users has occurred between mid-August and the end of March. This seasonal change is not a recent phenomenon, nor is it unique to False Bay. Similar behaviour has also been recorded in Gansbaai, Mossel Bay and abroad in California.

After months of no recorded sightings, shark spotters recorded a shark sighting at Fish Hoek Beach on the afternoon of Tuesday 24 August 2010 – their sixth sighting in False Bay since the previous shark season.

Some areas pose more of a danger for certain activities than others. Kayakers and surf-skiers are urged to be especially cautious in the area between Sunnycove and Glencairn Beach; while surfers and swimmers should be vigilant in the areas between Sunrise Beach and Strandfontein, as well as the Maccassar Beach area.

“Residents should always use beaches where shark spotters are on duty. They are urged to take the time to speak to the spotters to find out about recent sightings and activity, as well as current conditions which have an impact on shark spotting,” said Councillor Herron.

The public are requested to familiarise themselves with the new shark spotting signs, detailing the four-flag warning system. The updates to shark signage mean that: 
• A red flag indicates a Shark Alert. This flag will be flown during periods of increased shark activity, after a shark has recently been spotted in the area and the beach cleared, or when conditions are conducive to high shark activity
• A green flag means that the spotting conditions are good and no sharks have been seen
• A black flag means that the spotting conditions are poor, but no sharks have been seen 
• A white flag with a black shark diagram means that a shark is currently near the beach, and beach users must get out of the water. A siren is sounded and the white flag is raised.

During this summer season, all beaches will have a shark smart sign, while beaches with spotters on duty will also have Shark Spotting signs. Shark Spotting signs provide information on when the last sighting occurred, the flag warning system, operational hours, and updated daily spotting conditions. The Jaggers Walk area has been sign posted as a high risk area.

In addition, the public should be aware of the use of a siren or air horn which is used to sound warnings to clear the beach. “We are pleased to report that the malfunctioning siren at Muizenberg Beach has now been replaced by a suitably audible siren. Plans are also in place to install a siren at St James Beach as soon as possible,” said Councillor Herron.

Currently shark spotting programmes are operational at the following areas:
• Muizenberg Beach: Seven days a week from 08:00 – 18:00 
• St James Beach and Kalk Bay: Seven days a week from 08:00 – 18:00 
• Fish Hoek Beach: Seven days a week from 08:00 – 18:00
• Noordhoek (The Hoek): Seven days a week from 08:00 – 18:00

From the beginning of October, the afternoon shift will be extended to 19:00. All morning times will remain the same, except for Fish Hoek which will run from 07:00 – 19:00.

During the peak summer season the Shark Spotting programme will be extended to additional areas, namely Clovelly and Glencairn.

Regular and up-to-date information is available on the Shark Spotters website: www.sharkspotters.org.za

Shark safety tips
If people exercise caution and are aware of their environment, the risk of attack can be lowered. To reduce the risk of attack:

• Do not swim, surf or surf-ski when birds, dolphins or seals are feeding nearby
• Do not swim in deep water beyond the breakers
• Do not swim if you are bleeding
• Do not swim near river mouths
• Do not swim, surf or surf-ski near areas where trek-netting, fishing or spear fishing is taking place
• Do not swim, surf or surf-ski at night
• If a shark has recently been sighted in an area where no shark spotters are present, consider using another beach for the day
• First-time visitors to beach areas should ask the local law enforcement official, life guards or locals about the area
• Obey beach officials if told to leave the water
• For those people kayaking or surf-skiing far out to the sea, consider paddling in groups and staying close together (in a diamond formation)
• Consider using a personal shark shield when you go surfing or kayaking
• Pay attention to any shark signage on beaches


End - Issued by: Communication Department, City of Cape Town

CITY OF CAPE TOWN

MEDIA RELEASE 05 AUGUST 2010

City erects new shark signage at its beaches

 

The City of Cape Town, in conjunction with the Shark Spotters Programme, has designed three new signs to improve shark safety on Cape Town’s beaches. These signs seek to increase awareness about the presence of sharks (Great White sharks in particular), and to guide beach users on the workings of Shark Spotting Programme.

“Significant improvements have been made to the shark warning system used by the shark spotters, and the City urges the public to familiarise themselves with this system,” said the City’s Mayoral Committee Member for Community Services, Councillor Brett Herron.

The new signage can be found on beaches monitored by shark spotters, where the flag warning system is utilised, namely: Noordhoek Corner (the ‘Hoek’), Glencairn, Fish Hoek, Clovelly, St. James, Kalk Bay and Muizenberg. The signage is designed to be highly visible and has been strategically placed to ensure that it is accessible to all beach users.

The following changes have been made to the shark warning system:
• All flags now have a shark printed on them. This is to ensure that beach users are able to differentiate between the shark spotting flags and other,
unrelated flags
• Signs indicating a ‘high risk’ have been placed on Jaggers Walk at Fish Hoek Beach – a site where the most recent shark attacks have occured. However, beach users are reminded to always be vigilant and exercise caution when they swim at any beach.
• The modified shark spotting information sign explains the meaning of the colour-coded shark warning flags; shows information on shark spotter duty shifts; provides general visibility conditions; indicates the date of the last shark sighting and lists emergency services contact details.
• A new ‘Shark Smart’ sign conveys general information on sharks in Cape Town waters as well as advice on using the ocean. These will be erected in the near future. 
• The Red Flag now indicates a general shark alert, and is raised when a shark has been observed in the area in the past two hours, when an increased presence of sharks has been observed, or when conditions conducive to increased shark activity exist e.g. high fish activity or whale strandings. This flag will be lowered only when the alert is no longer necessary and will be flown in conjunction with one of the other spotting flags

The City appeals to the public to please locate and familiarise themselves with the new signs on the beach and the Shark Spotting Programme. Beach-based shark spotters are also available to answer any questions related to shark safety, and informational brochures can be obtained from them or the Save Our Seas Shark Centre in Kalk Bay. For recent shark activity and more information please visit www.sharkspotters.org.za

The public should continue to apply caution at the beach. Swimmers must immediately leave the water when warnings are sounded and not return to it until the shark spotters have given the all-clear.

In addition, the public are encouraged to: 
• Swim in groups
• Ensure that they are visible to others when swimming
• Ensure that they do not swim when there are marine mammals (whales, dolphins, seals) in the area
• Ensure that they do not swim if a marine mammal or carcass has washed up onto the beach
• Ensure they do not swim if there is a stranded marine mammal in the area

End

* Note to editors: A high-res version of the signage below is available; please send requests to media@capetown.gov.za

Issued by: Communication Department, City of Cape Town

Media enquiries: Sakhile Tsotsobe, Coastal Coordinator: Sport, Recreation and Amenities, City of Cape Town, Tel: 021 400 4638 or Cell: 072 626 3669

Sarah Titley, Shark Spotters Programme or Cell: 078 174 4244 

FATAL SHARK ATTACK - Fish Hoek Beach - 12th January 2010

 

Lloyd Skinner

Shark victim: Zimbabwean Lloyd 
Skinner (37)

Latest news reports from the People's Post 19th January 2010.

Click on the thumbnail to read each article.

 

 Shark Signs set for Jager's Walk

 Memorial for a "remarkable man"

 Local fishermen keep a watchful eye...

 Understanding the shark

 System not "100% effective strategy"

 

signage on beach

temporary signage Fish Hoek beach - February 2010

CITY OF CAPE TOWN - MEDIA RELEASE - 04 FEBRUARY 2010

City warns beach users of high shark activity

The City of Cape Town would like to warn beach users of high shark activity on the False Bay coast observed during the past few days, especially at Fish Hoek, St. James and Muizenberg beaches. This increased shark activity is most likely the result of high biological activity in the Bay, such as the presence of seals and schools of Yellowtail.

On beaches monitored by the Shark Spotters, the normal shark warning flags will be used. However, the public should note that in addition to these flags, a red flag will be flown throughout the day. This red flag serves as a warning of increased sightings of sharks in False Bay.

The City urges the public to be cautious and mindful of safety warnings. If shark warnings are sounded, they should leave the water immediately and not return to it until the Shark Spotters have indicated that it is safe to do so. In addition, the public is encouraged to:

•       Ensure that they swim in groups;
•       Ensure that they are visible to other people;
•       Refrain from swimming when there are marine mammals (whales, dolphins, seals) in the area; 
•       Refrain from swimming when a marine mammal or carcass has washed out on the beach; 
•       Refrain from swimming when there is a stranded marine mammal in the area.

Gert Bam, Director of Sport, Recreation and Amenities, encourages the public to acquaint themselves with the warning signals issued by the Shark Spotters when arriving at the beach. “The public should make a point of reading information signage provided on the beach and familiarising themselves with the colour-coded flags; they can enquire with a Shark Spotter based at the beach if necessary,” he said.

Shark Spotter flags indicate the following:

Green Flag: A Shark Spotter is on duty and visibility is good. There are no sharks in the area.

Red Flag: A shark has been spotted in the area in the last two hours.

Black Flag: A Shark Spotter is on duty but visibility is poor.

White Flag with black shark: There is a shark in the area. A siren is simultaneously sounded to clear the beach. Swimmers must stay out of the water until the flag is lowered.

In an emergency, the public should please dial 107 from a landline or 021 480 7700 from a cell phone.

“We urge the public to always read the signage and familiarise themselves with the flag system at Cape Town’s beaches. In this way they can relax and enjoy themselves at some of the most beautiful beaches in the world,” said Bam.

Further information on the flag system is provided below.

End

Issued by: Communication Department, City of Cape Town

Media enquiries: Gert Bam, Director: Sport, Recreation and Amenities, Tel: 021 400 5090    Cell: 084 222 1242

Sakhile Tsotsobe, Coastal Coordinator: Sport, Recreation and Amenities, Tel: 021 400 4638    Cell: 074 185 0123

 

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Body parts spotted after shark attack

By Caryn Dolley January 14 2010 at 07:12AM 

Condolences have started pouring in for the family of a tourist killed by a shark on Tuesday and at the same time a review detailing his attack has been compiled.

The review is expected to be released within a few days.

Lloyd Skinner, 37, an engineer from Harare, Zimbabwe, and UCT MBA graduate, was killed in front of a number of beach-goers two days ago while swimming at Fish Hoek.

On Skinner's Facebook account yesterday a friend, Gayle Reid, said: "Devastated by the news about Lloyd Skinner, taken by a shark on Fish Hoek beach yesterday, such a wonderful guy, so so sorry, love to his family."

Another friend, Cheryl Diane Nicholls, wrote: "My dear Skinner family, so sad and crushed, my love and thoughts and prayers are with you all."

Clint Skinner, a relative, replied that the well wishes and thoughts were "all we needed".

He said relatives, including Skinner's parents, John and Maggie, were flying to Cape Town.

Skinner's facebook account said he was in a relationship with Debra Paine.

A woman had been at the beach at the time of the attack but the Cape Times could yesterday not establish her name.

She was receiving trauma counselling.

Gregg Oelofse, head of the city's environmental policy and strategy, said he last night completed a review, based on information from witnesses, rescuers and others, into Tuesday's attack.

He said it would be made public possibly by tomorrow.

Oelofse and Finance, Economic Development and Tourism MEC Alan Winde extended their condolences to Skinner's family.

Ian Klopper, the National Sea Rescue Institute's (NSRI) helicopter duty commander, said an intense search was still being conducted to try and find Skinner's body.

He said a number of people had called in to say they had spotted body parts in the water but rescuers had not found anything.

"We don't expect to find anything," Klopper said.

He and others, rescuers and shark spotters, were "almost dead certain" a Great White shark had attacked Skinner.

Klopper said Tuesday's attack was "very out of character" as sharks usually bit their prey once but in the case with Skinner the shark, according to witnesses, had gone for Skinner twice and had then disappeared with his body.

Klopper said there had been four shark spottings in the Fish Hoek area early yesterday.

As a precaution, swimmers were prevented from entering the water at beaches from Glencairn to Muizenberg as conditions were not favourable for shark monitoring.

When the Cape Times team later flew in a helicopter along the coastline, it spotted at least five sharks in the vicinity of Muizenberg beach.

At one point three sharks swam near to each other forming the points of a triangle. The tips of their fins could be seen just peaking from the water.

In the background a number of fishers and beach-goers could be seen but none was swimming or wading out.

At Fish Hoek no one could be seen swimming in the water either but a number of people were on the shore.

The City of Cape Town yesterday issued warnings to bathers saying they should remain in shallow water and should not swim alone.

Bathers were also advised to have a someone watch them while they were in the water.

Gerhard Ras, sport and recreational mayoral committee member, said residents could visit closed beaches but would not be allowed to enter the water.

He said beach managers would update the public when beaches were re-opened.

In November 2004, a Fish Hoek woman, Tyna Webb, 77, was killed by a shark while swimming about 150 metres from the shore at about 7am. The fatal attack was said to have been the first in the area in more than a century. 

caryn.dolley@inl.co.za

This article was originally published on page 1 of Cape Times on January 14, 2010

 

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Hunt for shark after attack 

By Bronwynne Jooste, Murray Williams and Kowthar Solomons
Staff Reporters January 13 2010 at 01:43PM

The shark alarm was sounded along the False Bay coast soon after 9am today and authorities closed beaches from Strandfontein to Glencairn after a man was killed in a shark attack yesterday.

The attack, believed to have been by a great white shark, has added urgency to talks already under way between shark researchers and the City of Cape Town over a proposal to introduce real-time monitoring of the activity of tagged sharks in False Bay.

Meanwhile, shark researchers took to the water this morning to try to find the shark that attacked Lloyd Skinner, 37. 

Several bathers at Fish Hoek beach ignored the flags alerting them to sharks in the area, enjoying their usual early morning swim. Lifeguards and city law enforcement officials were kept busy asking people to get out of the water. 

The lifeguards came on duty at 7am today instead of their usual 10am start and will remain on duty until 6pm.

Fish Hoek resident Duncan Temple-Forbes said today that the incident had made him wary, but added that he would continue to swim at the beach.

Another, Jo Cullingworth, said residents were still in shock.

A lifeguard, who declined to be named, described yesterday's attack.

"I saw the fin. I stood up and saw it do a 360 and then it spun around. It took the guy under. 

"The shark's tail came out of the water. It was a big animal."

He alerted the other lifeguards by shouting "Shark, shark!" and then frantically ran from his tower on the beach into the surf.

"I was shouting: 'Shark,shark!' These bathers were about 15m away and not seeing what was happening.

"Then it was over. There was this pool of blood in the water."

Police spokesman November Filander said Skinner, a Zimbabwean on holiday, was swimming 100m from shore at 3.15pm when he was attacked by the shark.

Yesterday witnesses said the shark had attacked from a bend near the shore, a spot where they are regularly sighted.

Low visibility in the water had made it impossible for Skinner to react until it was too late.

After the initial attack, the shark had appeared to head back into deeper water, only to attack for a second time, lifeguards and other witnesses said. 

Witness Kathy Geldenhuys said she had seen "what looked like a 5m shark rising from the water" and biting Skinner.

She described the water at the site of attack as "stained with blood". 

Geldenhuys said she had started screaming "Shark!" and other swimmers had immediately got out of the water. 

National Sea Rescue Institute's Ian Klopper led a team of lifeguards, three small vessels and a helicopter as they searched the shallows for the body.

The search continued at first light today.

"We have cancelled the air and sea search as it is no longer a search but a recovery. 

"We are patrolling the beach," Klopper said.

Alison Kock, the white shark project leader with the Save Our Seas Foundation and Shark Spotters, said: "The Fish Hoek area is a home to the sharks so it wouldn't be uncommon for a shark sighting, especially during this season. 

"Over the past weekend alone, we recorded 19 shark sighting between Muizenberg and Kalk Bay. 

"Only one of those sightings was reported in Fish Hoek."

The poor visibility in the water had prevented the shark spotters from seeing the animal.

The last fatal shark attack in Fish Hoek was in November 2004 when Tyna Webb, 77, was killed by a shark after swimming 60m off Jagger Walk. 

Professor Evan Gilbert, a former senior lecturer in finance at UCT's Graduate School of Business, said Skinner, an MBA student in 2003, had been a quiet, dedicated person.

Meanwhile, sophisticated monitoring equipment is to be discussed again soon in earnest between shark experts and the City of Cape Town. - 
Additional reporting by Jade Witten

This article was originally published on page 1 of Cape Argus on January 13, 2010

 

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Officials battle to keep bathers out of the water in False Bay

 

By Khanyisa Tabata
13 January 2010



While a heat wave pounds the Cape Peninsula with temperatures well into the thirties, many people are ignoring shark warnings and are flocking to the beaches to cool off.

Officials say the almost continuous wailing of the warning sirens at Fish Hoek has kept most swimmers out of the water, but there are a few who venture in up to their knees.

DRC tourist 37-year-old Lloyd Skinner was taken by a Great White at Fish Hoek in waist deep water yesterday. Only his swimming goggles have been found.

Officials say the beaches will remain officially closed until it is safe to go into the water again.

Western Cape MEC responsible for tourism Alan Winde says the Province is doing everything in its power to ease the grief and pain of Skinner’s family.

Winde says that while there is little one can do to ease the emotional pain, his department will assist the family with logistical matters.

posted by Bush Radio News Team @ Wednesday, January 13, 2010

 

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'It's a risk every time you get in the water'
January 13 2010 at 04:13PM

Beaches from Glencairn to Muizenberg will be closed until further notice after a man was attacked by a shark while swimming at Fish Hoek beach on Tuesday afternoon, the City of Cape Town said.

"All beaches from Glencairn to Muizenberg will remain closed until the city is satisfied that the conditions for the monitoring of sharks have improved," according to a statement issued on Wednesday.

"It is likely that visibility for shark spotting will improve later this afternoon. The public will be informed as soon as there are any changes to the current situation."

The man, 37-year-old Lloyd Skinner from Zimbabwe, was neck deep in the water when he was attacked around 3pm.

'I would be amazed if we found anything now'
Witnesses spoke of seeing a fin and blood as he disappeared under the water.

The National Rescue Institute, the police and members of the public, armed with binoculars, have been searching for Skinner's body since the attack. So far only his swimming goggles have been found.

"I would be amazed if we found anything now," NSRI spokesperson Ian Klopper said.

"The shark attacked him three times. It didn't bite him and let him go. It came back and carried on eating."

Klopper said the NSRI had been receiving repeated reports of body parts being washed up on the beach, but none had been factual.

'There are a lot of sharks around at the moment'
He said the NSRI was preparing to end its search on Wednesday afternoon.

Beachgoers at Fish Hoek were only able to walk ankle deep in the water as the white and black shark flags waved around the beach and temperatures soared above 30 degrees Celsius in the city.

"You've got to be stupid to get in the water right now," Fish Hoek resident Eddie Roth said.

"There are a lot of sharks around at the moment."

Roth, who paddles regularly around Fish Hoek, said he and wife Allison had seen a four-metre-long great white beyond the kelp near the rocks on the side of the beach on Wednesday morning.

"We heard a shark and we came to take a look. When we got to the beach we saw a four-metre great white swimming very close to the rocks. It was just beyond the kelp."

Roth said he would keep on paddling despite the attack.

"It's a risk every time you get in the water, but normally there's very little chance of being attacked by a shark."

The city meanwhile appealed to bathers to remain in shallow water, no deeper than the waist.

People should not swim alone, but rather stay in a group. All swimmers should make sure there is a friend or family member who can see them while they are in the water.

The city will conduct an extensive review of the attack.

"Once all the information has been compiled, it will be made available to the public", said Gregg Oelofse, the head of the city's environmental policy and strategy department.

"The City would like to extend its sincere condolences to the victim's family. As a City, we pride ourselves on having one of the most beautiful coastlines for everyone to enjoy and events like yesterday are particularly sad for Cape Town."

A howling southeaster wind had caused poor visibility at Fish Hoek and other beaches on Tuesday afternoon, when the attack took place.

Shark spotters from the city's Shark Spotting Programme, on duty at Fish Hoek beach at the time of the attack, had raised the black flag to warn the public of poor visibility. The last fatal shark attack in Cape Town was in 2005. Spotters have reported more than 570 shark sightings since November 2004.

There have been frequent sightings in the past month.

An alert was sent out on Sunday after eight sightings were recorded between Muizenberg and Kalk Bay on Friday and Saturday. - Sapa

IOL

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Shark kills bather at top beach - Google News 13-01-2010

Tourist attacked in shallow water

Jan 12, 2010 10:17 PM | By LAUREN COHEN

A Zimbabwean tourist on a month-long holiday lost his life in a shark attack in Fish Hoek, Cape Town.

"Lifeguard Frederick Wagenvoorde was on his tower and saw lots of splashing and thrashing around in the water, and then a lot of blood," said Colleen Saunders, regional co-ordinator for Life-saving, Western Province.

The attack happened at 3.15pm. Other bathers were unaware of the attack until lifeguards signalled to them to get out of the water.

The man's partner was on the beach but, it is understood, did not see the attack.

Three craft from the National Sea Rescue Institute, a dinghy from Western Province Lifesaving, a helicopter and about 15 lifeguards combed sea, air and land yesterday in search of the victim.

His body had not been found by late last night.

"The man has been identified but [his] family has not yet been notified," Saunders said.

The man, who lives in the Democratic Republic of Congo, was due to spend a month in South Africa with his partner before leaving for the UK.

One of his two daughters lives in Kenya and the other in the US.

They had not been told of their father's death at the time of going to press last night.

The NSRI's Ian Klopper said the man was standing chest-deep in the water adjusting his goggles when he was dragged below the surface.

"The man's partner was here but we have sent her home. She is very shocked but is remaining hopeful, but the outlook does not look good," Klopper said.

Eye witness, Sally Wentworth, who lives on the mountainside overlooking the beach, said she heard shouting, looked outside and saw "red in the sea".

"At first it looked as if there were dolphins, a flurry in the water. Then I saw something floating in the water, obviously the body, and the shark's fin coming up, well above the water. It was not a nice thing to have witnessed."

Wentworth said the attack was over in about three minutes.

"We normally hear the siren [sounded by shark-spotters, warning swimmers to leave the water] but not this time. The black flag was out indicating conditions were too difficult for shark-spotters to see into the water," she said.

Cheryl-Samantha Owen, of the Save Our Seas Foundation, said the attack was the first indication that sharks were in the area.

The NSRI put out an alert on Monday to warn surfers and swimmers about increased shark activity in False Bay.

In 2004, regular Fish Hoek beach swimmer Tyna Webb, 77, was attacked by what was believed to have been a Great White shark. Her body was not found.

Alison Kock, director of research for the shark-spotting programme, which records behaviour and movement of the sharks, said the previous attack on a swimmer was in 2007.

"We have daily sightings but attacks are pretty rare," he said.

 

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Shark attack in water two-metres deep

 

13 January 2010, 06:39 By Caryn Dolley, Jo-Anne Smetherham and Michelle Jones



A Fish Hoek resident has described how the jaws of a "giant" shark clamped down on a swimmer just metres from other beach-goers.

"Holy sh*t. We just saw a gigantic shark eat what looked like a person in front of our house ... That shark was huge. Like dinosaur huge," Gregg Coppen posted on his Twitter account yesterday.

Witness Tweets shark-attack as it happens.

He witnessed the attack from his home near the beach.

The swimmer, a 37-year-old man from the Democratic Republic of Congo, on holiday in the country for a month, then disappeared underwater at Fish Hoek beach.

The search was called off as light faded last night and rescuers were expected to continue searching for his body this morning.

Last night the man could not be identified as most of his relatives had not been told about the attack.

His girlfriend who was at the beach with him, had been taken away from the scene and given trauma counselling.

Fish Hoek police station spokesperson, Peter Middleton, said an inquest docket had been opened.

He said he was shocked to hear the attack happened in water about two metres deep.

Kyle Johnston, of Diep River, said he and his friends had been swimming near the man when the shark struck.

"We were swimming only about 15 metres away from the guy. We were at about chest depth and he was a little deeper.

"We looked at the walkway and saw people waving towels at us, then we looked further out to sea and saw what looked like blood, and a man's leg come up."

"I was floating and I thought the people waving at us were joking, but then I looked back and saw a fin and blood," said his friend Dane Leo. 

Irishman Denis Lundon, who was on Jager Walk, saw "several bits of fish" that might have been parts of a single shark emerging from the water, then a swimmer being thrust chest-high out of the sea. 

"I jumped, waved my hat and roared and screamed at swimmers to get out of the water. I never want to experience this again. I'm going to block it out of my mind," he said.

"We saw the shark come back twice," Lundon's friend Phyllis McCartain, from Arondel in England, said.

"It had the man's body in its mouth, and his arm was in the air. Then the sea was full of blood."

Kathy Geldenhuys was sitting on a nearby bench with her husband at the time of the attack. "My husband had just pointed out how far the man was swimming from the other people. He asked what would happen if he was attacked by a shark, because he was so far away. The words were hardly cold when the shark attacked that man. The shark attacked twice; it turned and attacked the man again; I just saw the blood on the water."

Geldenhuys said she hadn't seen the shark before it attacked the man. "Only when it was attacking did I see the fin, but then I could see the whole body under the water. It was a very big shark."

Later, speaking to the Cape Times, Coppen described the shark as being "longer than a minibus and the rubber ducks lifeguards use".

"It was this giant shadow heading to something colourful. Then it sort of came out the water and took this colourful lump and went off with it. You could see it's whole jaw wrap around the thing which turned out to be a person," Coppen said.

He then saw people running around on the beach.

The National Sea Rescue Institute's helicopter duty commander Ian Klopper said a number of witnesses had reported seeing the man about 100 metres from the shore when the shark attacked.

Afterwards his body could not be located and Metro Red Cross Air Mercy Service spokeswoman Vanessa Horn said it appeared the shark had dragged the body with it.

The helicopter had headed towards Kalk Bay as that was the direction the shark had swum in, but it was not spotted. Klopper said aside from the rescue helicopter, four vessels were at sea trying to locate the man's body and rescuers were also doing patrols on the shoreline.

Shark scientist Alison Kock, speaking at a media briefing at the Fish Hoek Lifesaving Club, said eight sharks had been spotted between Muizenberg and St James last Friday, another eight on Saturday, and one on Sunday.

"We don't want people to panic," she said.

"But do be vigilant. We know sharks live here. Don't swim far out or by yourself, or if there have been lots of fish activity in the area."

Kock said the shark was very likely a Great White, the most commonly spotted shark in the area.

After a fatal attack at Fish Hoek five years ago, shark spotters were posted on the mountain slopes to look for sharks close to False Bay swimming spots.

At Fish Hoek, flags are raised to indicate whether sharks were spotted. 

Fish Hoek Lifesaving spokesman Clive Wakeford said yesterday a black flag, which denotes poor visibility, was flying at the time of the attack.

A white flag with a black shark on it was raised immediately after the attack, and lifeguards began telling people to leave the water and the beach. 

Yesterday's attack happened hours after the city's disaster risk management centre spokesman Wilfred Solomons-Johannes warned bathers to be on the look-out for sharks in the Fish Hoek area.

caryn.dolley@inl.co.za

michelle.jones@inl.co.za

This article was originally published on page 1 of The Cape Times on January 13, 2010

 

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BREAKING NEWS...... 12th January, 2010 

Man dies in CT shark attack
2010-01-12 17:10 - Duncan Alfreds

Cape Town - The NSRI has confirmed that a swimmer has been the victim of a shark attack at Fish Hoek beach near Cape Town.

Ian Klopper of the NSRI told News24 that an intensive search was underway to locate the swimmer, but had so far yielded nothing.

"A white male, between 32 and 38 years old has been taken by a shark and we have not been able to locate the patient," Klopper said. The identity of the victim is still unknown.

Twitter users also confirmed the attack.

"Holy sh*t, we just saw a GIGANTIC shark eat what looked like a person right in front of our house in fishhoek. Unbelievable," wrote skabenga.

Bathers have been warned by Cape Town Disaster management to be on the lookout for great white sharks which traditionally cruise this stretch of the coast at this time of year.

"The appearance of white sharks is normal during peak summer months in Cape Town near in-shore areas, as these sharks are known to hunt and feed along this stretch of coastline at this time of year," spokesperson Wilfred Solomons-Johannes said on Tuesday.

IOL

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ONLY WAIST DEEP ?

Unconfirmed reports state that the shark severed the man's lower torso before circling and returning for the remainder. Onlookers also describe how the man was "only waist deep" in the water when the shark initially attacked him suggesting that it was in less than a metre of water. The two phase attack also may explain why many onlookers thought that a second man a "rescuer" was also a victim of this attack.

and BATHERS.... !!!

The webmaster of this site and a colleague witnessed the desperate search by rubber duck and speedboat for the body or other remains in very choppy sea with a strong South Easterly wind. Despite the flying of the shark flag on the beach we were astonished to see a middle aged couple walk into and start bathing in the sea about 15 metres from the water's edge while the search was in progress. They were it seems the only people on the beach at the time. Did they not think this strange? From their location they had come onto the beach from the Trek Fishermens' launch area to the northern side of the main beach and were seemingly unaware of the attack or the shark warning visible to the southern end. They were however not long in the water, the search was called off by dusk at 19:30 and the flag was taken down shortly thereafter. 

- Donald Gill
 :: www.fishhoek.com

R.I.P to the unfortunate victims of shark attacks worldwide and heartfelt condolences to your families. In the midst of your sorrows at these times, you too are not forgotten.

NB: acknowledgments and disclaimer: The news reports included in this page were copied and reproduced without the prior consent of the agencies concerned. They are provided for the benefit of readers both local and international. All reports are credited to their authors and you are strongly encouraged to follow the links provided to browse them at source. (Consents are currently being sought).

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Cape Times 12/1/10 23:00

"Blood in the water was all I could see"

By Caryn Dolley, Jo-Anna Smetherham and Michelle Jones

A Fish Hoek resident has described how the jaws of a giant shark clamped down on a swimmer just metres from other beach-goers.

"Holy sh*t. We just saw a gigantic shark eat what looked like a person in front of our house... That shark was huge. Like dinosaur huge," Gregg Coppen posted on his Twitter account on Tuesday (see Witness Tweets shark-attack as it happens for Coppen's tweets).

He witnessed the attack from his home near the beach.

The swimmer then disappeared underwater at Fish Hoek beach. The 37-year-old from Harare, Zimbabwe, had been living in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and had been on holiday in South Africa.

The search was called off as light faded last night and rescuers were expected to continue searching for his body on Wednesday morning. On Tuesday night, the man could not be named as most of his relatives had not been told about the attack.

His girlfriend, who was at the beach with him, had been taken away from the scene and given trauma counselling.

Fish Hoek police station spokesperson Peter Middleton said an inquest docket had been opened.
He said he was shocked to hear the attack happened in water about two metres deep.

Kyle Johnston, of Diep River, said he and his friends had been swimming near the man when the shark struck.

"We were swimming only about 15 metres away from the guy. We were at about chest depth and he was a little deeper.

"We looked at the walkway and saw people waving towels at us, then we looked further out to sea and saw what looked like blood, and a man's leg come up."

"I was floating and I thought the people waving at us were joking, but then I looked back and saw a fin and blood," his friend Dane Leo said.

Irishman Denis Lundon, who was on Jager Walk, saw "several bits of fish" that might have been parts of a single shark emerging from the water, then a swimmer being thrust chest-high out of the sea.

"I jumped, waved my hat and roared and screamed at swimmers to get out of the water. I never want to experience this again. I'm going to block it out of my mind," he said.

"We saw the shark come back twice," Lundon's friend Phyllis McCartain, from England, said.
"It had the man's body in its mouth, and his arm was in the air. Then the sea was full of blood."

Kathy Geldenhuys was sitting on a nearby bench with her husband at the time of the attack. "My husband had just pointed out how far the man was swimming from the other people. He asked what would happen if he was attacked by a shark, because he was so far away. The words were hardly cold when the shark attacked that man. The shark attacked twice; it turned and attacked the man again; I just saw the blood on the water."

Geldenhuys said she hadn't seen the shark before it attacked the man. "Only when it was attacking did I see the fin, but then I could see the whole body under the water. It was a very big shark."

Later, speaking to the Cape Times, Coppen described the shark as being "longer than a minibus and the rubber ducks lifeguards use".

"It was this giant shadow heading to something colourful. Then it sort of came out the water and took this colourful lump and went off with it. You could see it's whole jaw wrap around the thing which turned out to be a person," Coppen said.

He then saw people running around on the beach.
The National Sea Rescue Institute's helicopter duty commander Ian Klopper said a number of witnesses had reported seeing the man about 100 metres from the shore when the shark attacked.

Afterwards his body could not be located and Metro Red Cross Air Mercy Service spokesperson Vanessa Horn said it appeared the shark had dragged the body with it.

The helicopter had headed towards Kalk Bay as that was the direction the shark had swum in, but it was not spotted. Klopper said aside from the rescue helicopter, four vessels were at sea trying to locate the man's body and rescuers were also doing patrols on the shoreline.

Shark scientist Alison Kock, speaking at a media briefing at the Fish Hoek Lifesaving Club, said eight sharks had been spotted between Muizenberg and St James last Friday, another eight on Saturday, and one on Sunday.

"We don't want people to panic," she said.
"But do be vigilant. We know sharks live here. Don't swim far out or by yourself, or if there have been lots of fish activity in the area."

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Cape Times 12/1/10

Search for shark attack victim called off
12 January 2010, 19:00

Witness Tweets shark-attack as it happens.

By Caryn Dolley

The search has been called off for the night for the body of a tourist from the Democratic Republic of Congo killed in a shark attack on Tuesday afternoon at Fish Hoek beach on Cape Town's False Bay coast.

Divers and rescuers from the police and the National Sea Rescue Institute stood down as the water turned murky in failing light.

There has thus far been no remains found of the man who had been on holiday in SA for a month.

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"That shark was huge. Like a dinosaur, huge"
12 January 2010, 19:52

Witness Tweets shark-attack as it happens

By Caryn Dolley, Jo-Anne Smetherham and Michelle Jones

A Fish Hoek resident has described how the jaws of a"giant" shark clamped down on a swimmer just metres from other beach-goers.

"Holy sh*t. We just saw a gigantic shark eat what looked like a person in front of our house... That shark was huge. Like dinosaur huge," Gregg Coppen posted on his Twitter account on Tuesday.

He witnessed the attack from his home near the beach.

The swimmer, a 37-year-old man from the Democratic Republic of Congo and on holiday in the country for a month, then disappeared underwater at Fish Hoek beach.

caryn.dolley@inl.co.za

 

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DRC tourist succumbs to a fatal shark attack
12 January 2010, 18:28

Witness Tweets shark-attack as it happens.

By Caryn Dolley

A tourist from the Democratic Republic of Congo succumbed to a fatal shark attack at Fish Hoek on Cape Town's False Bay coast this afternoon.

The man who had been on holiday in SA for a month, could not be identified as most of his relatives had not been informed.

A woman, believed to be his wife and who was at the beach with him, had been taken away from the scene and given trauma counselling.

Fish Hoek resident Gregg Coppen witnessed the attack from his home near the beach.

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This warning was issued 4/5 hrs before the fatal attack............

Cape Town issues shark warning
12 January 2010, 12:14

Cape Town's disaster management warned bathers to be on the lookout for Great White sharks which traditionally cruise that stretch of the coast for a nibble at this time of year.

"The appearance of White sharks is normal during peak summer months in Cape Town near in-shore areas, as these sharks are known to hunt and feed along this stretch of coastline at this time of year," spokesperson Wilfred Solomons-Johannes said on Tuesday.

The sharks have not been seen coming close to the beaches or near swimmers. Shark spotters have seen them along the False Bay coastline between Sunrise Beach and Fish Hoek.

Bathers and swimmers along the False Bay coastline are urged to be cautious and to adhere to the safety warnings of shark spotters.

When the spotters sound their alarms to warn of shark sightings near to bathing and surfing areas, bathers and surfers must leave the water immediately until the danger passes.

Information on recent shark movements in False Bay is available on the Shark Spotters website www.sharkspotters.org.za - Sapa

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Timeslive.co.za

This report was posted at 17:03

Man missing after suspected shark attack in Fish Hoek


Jan 12, 2010 5:03 PM | By Staff Reporter


The Fish Hoek Surf Life Saving Club and law enforcement have launched a search for a man believed to have been attacked by a shark while swimming at Fish Hoek beach which has become notorious for Great White Shark attacks.

According to spokesman for the Western Life Saving Club spokesman, Keith Mathews, a man is believed to have been pulled under by a shark while swimming about 20 metres out to sea. He said the people around him were not aware of what was happening when he was pulled under.

Lifesavers promptly sounded the siren for swimmers to get out of the water.

- End of breaking news reports.

 

 

 

    SHARKS - The Great White
    (Carcharodon carcharias)

     


    False Bay is one of the world's premier breeding grounds for the Great White Shark.

    Nevertheless the number of attacks on humans is very small and fatalities even rarer. Sadly a veteran swimmer of 17 years Tyna Webb (77) was killed by a Great White on 15th November 2004 while swimming between 60 and 100 m off Sunny Cove to the South of Fish Hoek beach. (see link)

    The Town has moved swiftly to respond to this disaster and a Sharkwatch group has been set up to liase between the Trek Fishermen Fish Spotters up on the mountain, the Surf Rescue and Law Enforcement.

    Please read the attached statement from this group.

    Links:

    You can also obtain more information from the following links:-

  • Review of the GW Shark (UK)
  • Shark School (information for kids)
  • Wikipedia - the G W Shark
  • Nat. Geographic - Filming the GWS

gws

 

Sharkwatch

shark watch

Perched high above Fish Hoek Beach the Shark Watcher keeps his eyes peeled for sharks ready to notify the authorities by radio......

shark in bay oct 05

Luckily he spotted this shark and the siren sounded to clear the water while the shark cruised the southern corner of the bay only metres from water's edge.                                             Shark Watch photos Donald Gill :: Copyright © 2005 Fishhoek.com

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SHARK ATTACK - JULY 2006

Fishhoek lifesaver falls onto shark during attack on surf ski

July 29, 2006

By Henri Du Plessis

A Fish Hoek lifesaver has survived a shockingly close encounter with a large shark that attacked his surf ski while he was out paddling in the bay. 

Lyle Maasdorp, 19, felt himself and his ski being lifted out of the water and then heard a loud sound like a car smashing against something, before he realised that a shark had taken a large bite out of the rear end of his borrowed surf ski. 

Maasdorp and four friends from the Fish Hoek Lifesaving Club were paddling about 20m off Jaeger's Walk, near the point of Fish Hoek Bay about 4.30pm yesterday. "I did not see or hear anything until I suddenly found that I was being lifted up from behind," he said. "At first I thought I was on a rock and the water was receding and then I thought one of the guys was playing a trick on me, but then I heard the sound and more crunching sounds." 

Maasdorp looked around and saw the shark with its huge jaws wrapped around the side of the ski's rear. 

"Then he started thrashing, obviously to tear out a piece. The ski started shipping water and with the buoyancy changing I was sinking down."

Lyle the shark took this bite out of the surf-ski


"I fell out of the ski, between the shark and the ski with my one hand on the shark's back."Lifesaver Anthony Pearse, 37, was about 10m behind Maasdorp when the shark attacked. 

"There was the shark, out of nowhere, I could not believe it," Pearse said. "I saw him fall out of the ski onto the shark and then climb onto his ski and over the other side."


Pearse paddled up to Maasdorp and helped him get onto the back of his ski, before rowing for the rocks nearby, where they both got out of the water "quite quickly", Pearse said.


When he realised that he had escaped the shark and survived, Maasdorp screamed.


Maasdorp caught a lift back to the club, while his companions paddled back, hugging the rocks. He then sped out with a rubber duck to recover the damaged ski.


But the experienced young lifesaver put on a brave face over his fright. "On Sunday I will be out there again," he said.

henri.duplessis@inl.co.za

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SAFETY MEASURES SUBSEQUENT TO THE SHARK ATTACK 15.11.2004

Subsequent to the tragic shark attack which took place on Fish Hoek Beach on Monday 15.11.2004, the following steps have been taken to improve the rapid response in the event of a shark being spotted in the near proximity to bathers:

* The 3 main roleplayers, namely Fish Hoek Surf Life Saving Club, The Law Enforcement officials stationed at Fish Hoek Beach and the Trek Fishermen have formed a partnership in an effort to formalise protocols in the event of a shark sighting.

*  Fish Hoek Surf Lifesaving have utilised their own funds to purchase and supply Law Enforcement and the Trek Fishermen with Marine Band VHF Radio’s operating on the same channel as the Lifesaving Club.

* Fish Hoek Surf Lifesaving have also paid to upgrade the newly installed 1km range siren to one with a range of 3 kilometres.

* Fish Hoek Surf Lifesaving will ensure that the Inflatable Rubber Rescue Craft is utilised whenever possible to patrol the bathing areas.  This has been found to be a major shark deterrent.

*  Bathing areas will now be demarcated on Fish Hoek Beach by means of marker buoys which have been sponsored by SMIT MARINE S.AFRICA and will be laid courtesy of the South African Navy.  Clovelly beach will have a demarcated bathing area indicated by flags placed in position by Fish Hoek Lifeguards on duty.

* During the December/January Holiday peak season the waters will be scanned regularly by the various rescue service Helicopters.

* Fish Hoek Surf Lifesaving is fully equipped with all medical equipment necessary for major trauma and work in close liason with Cape Medical Response who are never more than a couple of minutes away.

* Steps are being taken to employ a trek fisherman spotter on a permanent basis from 07h00 to 19h00 throughout the peak season at times when the Trek Fishermen are not spotting for fish.  This will be subject to sponsorship being found.

* Until the 3.12.04 Lifeguards will be on duty at weekends only from 09h00 – 18h00.  Law Enforcement are on duty daily from 07h00 – 19h00.

* With effect from 4.12.04 until 2.5.2005, Lifeguards will be on duty from 09h00 – 18h00 daily and law enforcement from 07h00 – 19h00.

On the sighting of a shark the Trek Fishermen spotters based on Elsies Peak will immediately radio the Fish Hoek Surf Lifeguards and the transmission  will be received simultaneously by the Law Enforcement officials.  The siren will immediately be activated, the rubber rescue craft launched if not already in the water and the lifeguards will clear all recreational water users from the sea. This should not take longer than 2 minutes.  The Shark flag will be raised and will remain until such time as the all clear is given. 
We wish to remind the public that our  approximately 90 Lifeguards, most of whom are still at school or University are highly skilled , motivated and dedicated and give up much of their free time to render a very valuble service to the Community.  We all remain absolutely committed to keeping the beaches as safe as is possible.

The Trek Fishermen are a valuable  asset to the community and their skills in spotting sharks have almost certainly averted possible other tragedies in the past by their quick and timely warnings. 

Fish Hoek Law Enforcement are equally committed to providing their community with a safe enviroment.

Finally, we urge the Public to swim within the confines of the demarcated bathing areas, listen to instructions from the Lifeguards or Law Enforcement and to clear the water immediately in the event of the  siren being sounded.

Any donations will be gladly accepted in an effort to improve our service to the community.

We wish you a pleasant holiday season.

MARTIN J WILLIAMS 
CHAIRMAN  -  FISH HOEK SURF LIFESAVING CLUB 17.11.2004

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Extracts from Wikipedia:

It is estimated that a person's chance of getting attacked by a shark is 1 in 11.5 million, and a person's chance of getting killed by a shark is 1 in 264.1 million[8]. The annual number of people who drown is 3,306, whereas the annual number of shark fatalities is 1[9]. In comparison, humans kill 100 million sharks each year.

Prevention

While there is no way to completely eliminate the possibility of a shark attack when you are in the water, here are some precautions you may take to reduce that risk[28]:

    • Avoid the water at dawn, dusk, or night, when sharks tend to feed.
    • Avoid areas where sharks generally locate themselves, such as murky waters and steep drop-offs.
    • Avoid bleeding.
    • Don't swim alone, always be near a group of people, and if possible, avoid being at the edge of the group.
    • Obey instructions from lifeguards and other authority.
    • Most importantly, use common sense, remember that all sharks (even ones we consider "harmless") are wild animals and there is no way of us knowing for sure how these creatures will react. Always err on the side of caution and respect what they are capable of.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shark_attack

 
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